FUDCon Pune 2015

Pune, 26th to 28th June, 2015

When

26th to 28th June, 2015 09:00 am - 06:00 pm

Website: FUDCon Pune 2015

Where

MIT College of Engineering
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Friday, 26th June 2015

Time Auditorium Seminar Hall [4th Floor] D203 [2nd Floor] D405 [4th Floor] D406 [4th Floor] D204 [2nd Floor] D205 [2nd Floor]
9:00 am Delivering Fedora for everything and everyone
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Delivering Fedora for everything and everyone

This Talk will cover how we make Fedora, The changes we are making in the tools and processes, and outline areas people could contribute. We will outline a long term plan to make composes a seamless and transparent process. Ways to make rawhide more stable and the release process less painful.

By:
Dennis Gilmore
June 26, 2015, 9:00 am to 9:50 am
Hall: Auditorium Track: Keynote Type: Keynote
           
9:10 am            
9:20 am            
9:30 am            
9:40 am            
9:50 am              
10:00 am Education Panel
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Education Panel

A panel discussion on topics related to FOSS in Education. Panelists include faculty members from educational institutions.

By:
Amit Shah
June 26, 2015, 10:00 am to 11:30 am
Hall: Auditorium Track: Main Conference Type: Panel
    Introduction to kdump and kernel crash analysis
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Introduction to kdump and kernel crash analysis


Kdump[1] is a kexec based crash dumping mechansim for Linux. In the event of a system crash, kdump creates a memory image (vmcore) that can help in determining the cause of the crash.

Crash utility[2] allows you to determine the cause of the system crash by analyzing a core dump created by kdump.

[1] http://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/Fedora/16/html/System_Administrators...
[2] http://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/Fedora/14/html/Deployment_Guide/s1-k...

By:
Buland Singh, Gopal Tiwari
June 26, 2015, 10:00 am to 11:30 am
Hall: D405 [4th Floor] Track: Workshop Type: Workshop
Introduction to Software Defined Storage - Ceph and GlusterFS
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Introduction to Software Defined Storage - Ceph and GlusterFS



Software-defined storage (SDS):

Software-defined storage (SDS) is an evolving concept for computer data storage software to manage policy-based provisioning and management of data storage independent of hardware.
Software-defined storage definitions typically include a form of storage virtualization to separate the storage hardware from the software that manages the storage infrastructure. The software enabling a software-defined storage environment may also provide policy management for feature options such as deduplication, replication, thin provisioning, snapshots and backup

Ceph:

Ceph is a distributed object store and file system designed to provide excellent performance, reliability and scalability. On storage side it is very flexible as it support three type of storage :

Object Storage:

Ceph provides seamless access to objects using native language bindings or radosgw, a REST interface that’s compatible with applications written for S3 and Swift.

Block Storage:

Ceph’s RADOS Block Device (RBD) provides access to block device images that are striped and replicated across the entire storage cluster.

File System:

Ceph provides a POSIX-compliant network file system that aims for high performance, large data storage, and maximum compatibility with legacy applications.

GlusterFS:

GlusterFS is an open source, distributed file system capable of scaling to several petabytes and handling thousands of clients. GlusterFS clusters together storage building blocks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect, aggregating disk and memory resources and managing data in a single global namespace. GlusterFS is based on a stackable user space design and can deliver exceptional performance for diverse workloads.

Agenda:

1. Software Defined Storage Definition
2. Software Defined Storage Characteristics
3. SDS as Product : Ceph features and How it is integrated with Openstack
4. SDS as Product : GlusterFS and features
Session Track:
Talk
Session Time Slot(s):
Experience level:
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By:
Vikhyat Umrao
June 26, 2015, 10:00 am to 10:40 am
Hall: D406 [4th Floor] Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
   
10:10 am        
10:20 am        
10:30 am        
10:40 am          
10:50 am     Geo-Replication and Disaster Recovery : GlusterFS
 Attend Link

Geo-Replication and Disaster Recovery : GlusterFS



GlusterFS is an open source, distributed file system capable of scaling to several petabytes and handling thousands of clients. GlusterFS clusters together storage building blocks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect, aggregating disk and memory resources and managing data in a single global namespace. GlusterFS is based on a stackable user space design and can deliver exceptional performance for diverse workloads.

Geo-Replication is way to sync gluster volume to a remote site or we can say it is the way to distribute data across geographically distributed data networks.

GlusterFS Geo-replication provides a continuous, asynchronous, and incremental replication service from one site to another over Local Area Networks (LANs), Wide Area Network (WANs), and across the Internet.

Using GlusterFS Geo-replication, we can establish data redundancy in your storage environment, providing disaster recovery through existing LAN, WAN, and Internet connections.

Agenda :

1) Geo-Replication Introduction
2) How Geo-Replication works in GlusterFS
3) Data Recovery from a replicated site in case of disaster.

By:
Bipin Kunal
June 26, 2015, 10:50 am to 11:20 am
Hall: D406 [4th Floor] Track: Distributed Storage Type: Talk
   
11:00 am        
11:10 am        
11:20 am          
11:30 am         Efficient data maintenance in GlusterFS using Databases
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Efficient data maintenance in GlusterFS using Databases

A major challenge for any distributed file system like GlusterFS, is conducting data maintenance without seriously affecting I/O response time. Solutions like a namespace crawl are inherently inefficient and may not provide correct information for any single point in time. Using a small, well integrated database provides a major improvement over a namespace crawl, with minimal impact to system performance. The talk will focus on the results of a study to integrate a database with GlusterFS. Also the talk will include a demo.

By:
Joseph Elwin Fernandes
June 26, 2015, 11:30 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: D406 [4th Floor] Track: Distributed Storage Type: Talk
   
11:40 am TBD
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TBD

By:
Various
June 26, 2015, 11:40 am to 12:20 pm
Hall: Auditorium Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
DNF - New Package Manager
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DNF - New Package Manager

DNF is a package manager for rpm systems. DNF helps users to automatically update their systems. When you want to install any rpm package, you don't need to specify all its dependency packages to dnf install command. It automatically finds dependencies and figures out what extra things should be required to install given packages.

Using DNF, people can install new packages, update existing packages, remove installed packages, query packages. DNF has a plugin interface for adding extra features. DNF can also be used from any python programs using its API.

The DNF was forked from Yum in early 2012. The goal of the DNF is to develop something that looks like Yum from the command line but provides better experience for people interested in writing plugins and extensions for the DNF. DNF uses libsolv as a dependency resolver. The DNF development is compatible with python 2.x and 3.x versions.

We will cover following topics in this session
Introduction
Goals for DNF development
hawkey
libsolv
librepo
what is changed from yum to DNF, difference between them

Fedora DNF Feature -> http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Features/DNF
DNF source code -> https://github.com/rpm-software-management/dnf
DNF documentation -> http://dnf.readthedocs.org/en/latest/

By:
Parag Nemade
June 26, 2015, 11:40 am to 12:20 pm
Hall: Seminar Hall [4th Floor] Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
ABI Compatibility for Dummies
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ABI Compatibility for Dummies

Application Binary Interface (ABI) is the interface between two program modules, one of which is often a library or operating system, at the level of machine code.

As an application developer it is very important to be aware of how to keep ABI stable for interfaces like libraries they provide/consume in their application. Incompatible ABI can lead to undesired behaviour in your application and to correct it you may need to recompile whole application or even modify source code.

Lot of developers are not informed about ABI and intention of this talk is to make them understand how important it is and help them maintain ABI compatible application . This talk will cover -
* Brief introduction to what ABI is and why is it important
* Benefits of having compatible ABI
* How you can avoid breaking ABI in libraries you write
* C/C++ example showing ABI interfaces exposed from a library
* Existing tools checking Binary compatibility

By:
Sinny Kumari
June 26, 2015, 11:40 am to 12:20 pm
Hall: D203 [2nd Floor] Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
Workshop on UTRRS
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Workshop on UTRRS



Brief : The Unicode Text Rendering Reference System (UTRRS) is a open source web-based application which compares a rendered text character with a reference image of a text character, for comparison of differences between the two.

Comparing the results of a text rendering engine to actual text can be done without the ability to read or comprehend the language in question. This ability is available for Codepoints (Unicode Character Set), GSUB (Glyph Substitution), and GPOS (Glyph Positioning).

Project URL : http://fuelproject.org/utrrs/index

Expectation : We would like to invite contributors for UTRRS localization as well as Internationalization perspective. The contributing areas would most tentatively be Glyph and composed character verifications for several languages, Design level changes in UTRRS web application, Introducing auto-detecting defects in Fonts rendering etc.

By:
Satyabrata Maitra, Rajesh Ranjan, Bhushan Barve
June 26, 2015, 11:40 am to 1:10 pm
Hall: D405 [4th Floor] Track: Workshop Type: Workshop
Automating Infrastructure by Foreman and Katello
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Automating Infrastructure by Foreman and Katello

Foreman and Katello both are open source projects. Katello brings the full power of content management alongside the provisioning and configuration capabilities of Foreman. This helps administrator to manage on-premise clouds including vm's and baremetal machines. This talk will covers a brief introduction of content management using katello and how custom contents available to your hosts by moving it through environment paths that mimic traditional development workflows (Dev → QE → Stage → Production). We will also install Fedora using foreman.

Audience: Intermediate, any who wants to know how to provision hundred of VM's in one go or who wants to install infrastructure in one go.

Talk agenda:
------------
- Introduction to Katello and Foreman
- Content management using katello
- Discover, provision bare-metal infrastructure
- Create and manage instances across private clouds
- Demonstration of Fedora Install from Foreman

By:
Sachin Ghai
June 26, 2015, 11:40 am to 12:20 pm
Hall: D204 [2nd Floor] Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
 
11:50 am  
12:00 pm    
12:10 pm Deploying and Managing Gluster using OVirt
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Deploying and Managing Gluster using OVirt

Gluster

GlusterFS is an open source, distributed file system capable of scaling to several petabytes (actually, 72 brontobytes!) and handling thousands of clients. GlusterFS clusters together storage building blocks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect, aggregating disk and memory resources and managing data in a single global namespace. GlusterFS is based on a stackable user space design and can deliver exceptional performance for diverse workloads.

Gluster and Ovirt Integration

Ovirt is mainly a Virtualization management platform. It supports KVM based viritualization capabilities. Gluster community is working with Ovirt for the past two years to integrate Gluster management with Ovirt. Gluster managment integration with Ovirt gives a cool web UI for the admin to manage the Gluster cluster. I am planning to give a talk on Deploying and Managing Gluster using OVirt and following will be my agenda.

Introduction to oVirt and GlusterFS
Ovirt Gluster Integration
Demo
Upcoming Gluster features in oVirt
Reference: http://blogs-ramesh.blogspot.in/2014/12/deploying-gluster-using-ovirt.html

By:
Ramesh Nachimuthu
June 26, 2015, 12:10 pm to 12:40 pm
Hall: D406 [4th Floor] Track: Distributed Storage Type: Talk
 
12:20 pm          
12:30 pm Open Security for Open Source!
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Open Security for Open Source!



This is a talk about how security in an Open Source eco-system really works. Similar to the process of writing, reviewing code, documenting and bug filing/fixing etc. Security in Open source distributions are also worked on collectively.

- How co-operative handling of security bugs benefits all.
- What makes open source possibly more secure, then closed-source software.
- What are the current issues with handling security issues collectively.
- Fedora Security Team.

By:
Huzaifa Sidhpurwala
June 26, 2015, 12:30 pm to 1:10 pm
Hall: Auditorium Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
Vagrant for Effective DevOps Culture
 Attend Link

Vagrant for Effective DevOps Culture



DevOps has proven to be a culture that helps you ship faster, creating a better feedback mechanism between developers, operations and the systems they work on. It has been around for a while, but it is still not something that teams have been able to adopt completely and practice on a day-to-day basis, despite of its proven results. There is a gap between developers and operations, which needs to be closed.

In this talk, we will see how Vagrant can help developers and operations individually, and then how it can be used to bridge that gap for developers and operations to work more closely with each other. We will see how Vagrant can prove to be an effective tool for developers as it can offer cheap throw away environments that closely resembles production. We will also see how operations can make use of Vagrant for quickly testing out configuration management changes. And finally, we will discuss some advanced use-cases of Vagrant.

By:
Vaidik Kapoor
June 26, 2015, 12:30 pm to 1:10 pm
Hall: Seminar Hall [4th Floor] Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
spartakus: Fighting kernel ABI breakages through semantic processing of linux source code
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spartakus: Fighting kernel ABI breakages through semantic processing of linux source code


I would like to introduce the spartakus project as a possible replacement for genksyms. genksyms is a tool that is currently used by the linux kernel build process to generate CRC checksums for exported kernel symbols that constitute the linux kernel ABI.

spartakus a project that has been forked from upstream sparse. Modifications include addition and modification of some files as mentioned below.

Files added:
1. checksum.h and checksum.c

This contains code taken from genksyms that deals with generation of checksums
for strings.

2. check_kabi.h and check_kabi.c

This contains code that deals with semantic processing of exported kernel
symbols while generating CRC checksums for them.

The following files were modified which were originally part of the sparse
source code:
1. Makefile
2. parse.h and parse.c
3. lib.c
4. tokenize.c

Also a new binary 'check_kabi' upon compilation is added, which can be used during the linux kernel build process to generate the checksums for all the exported symbols. These checksums are stored in Module.symvers file which is generated during the build process.

genksyms has been the tool that had been doing this job of generating the checksums for exported symbols that constitute the kernel ABI so far, but it has several problems/limitations that make the job of developers difficult wrt maintaining the stability of the kernel ABI. A couple of such limitations are as stated below:

1. genksyms generates different checksums for structs/unions for declarations which are semantically similar. For example, for the following 2 declarations for the struct 'list_head':

struct list_head {
struct list_head *next, *prev;
};

struct list_head {
struct list_head *next;
struct list_head *prev;
};

both declarations are essentially the same and should not result in a change in kABI wrt 'list_head'.

Sparse treats these 2 declarations as semantically the same and different checksums are not generated.

2. For variable declarations with just unsigned/signed specification with no type specified, sparse considers the type as int by default.

Hence,

'unsigned foo' is converted to 'unsigned int foo' and then processed to get the corresponding checksum.

On the other hand, genksyms would generate different checksums for different 2 definitions which are semantically the same.

=====

I will touch on the following points during my talk:

* Linux Kernel ABI
- The binary interface exported by the linux kernel and the accompanying modules.
- Module.symvers and CRC checksums for the exported symbols

* Why is kernel ABI stability important and how the kernel ABI stability is maintained currently?
- genksyms
- Limitations of genksyms

* spartakus
- What it is essentially
- Short discussion of the workflow followed to generate the checksums
- How it can provide a better alternative to genksyms
- State of the project and its limitations

* Questions

By:
Samikshan Bairagya
June 26, 2015, 12:30 pm to 1:10 pm
Hall: D203 [2nd Floor] Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
Automated behave based UI testing
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Automated behave based UI testing

Ensuring that the GUI of the application work properly before
releasing the product is imperative. After all, its only the GUI that
would be directly perceived by the user. All your performance
optimizations, your algorithmic enhancements in the backend would be
useless if user is not able to interact with your application
properly, or according to his given specifications. Hence, UI testing
in any development process is very important. In this talk, I would be
talking about making this process automated and organized using
Behaviour-driven development based python tool, `behave'. This could
save a lot of developer's time which can be invested in other
important tasks enhancing the overall user experience.

I would take the example of similar work that I have been doing in
gnome-photos[1] to demonstrate this, and talk about how you can (and
should) use this UI testing paradigm/methodology for automating UI
tests in your applications.

[1] https://bugzilla.gnome.org/show_bug.cgi?id=742732

By:
Pranav Kant
June 26, 2015, 12:30 pm to 1:10 pm
Hall: D204 [2nd Floor] Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
 
12:40 pm Hyperconvergence with oVirt and GlusterFS
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Hyperconvergence with oVirt and GlusterFS



This talk is about the ongoing effort of hyperconvergence in the data center using oVirt and GlusterFS.

It will cover -

Introduction to oVirt and GlusterFS

What is HyperConvergence

Single pane of administration for storage and virtualization

Scaling out

Roadmap


By:
Sahina Bose
June 26, 2015, 12:40 pm to 1:10 pm
Hall: D406 [4th Floor] Track: Distributed Storage Type: Talk
 
12:50 pm  
1:00 pm  
1:10 pm Lunch    
1:20 pm    
1:30 pm    
1:40 pm    
1:50 pm    
2:00 pm Lightning Talks
 Attend Link

Lightning Talks

Come over and give a lightning talk.

By:
Various
June 26, 2015, 2:00 pm to 2:30 pm
Hall: Auditorium Track: Lightning Talks Type: Talk
           
2:10 pm            
2:20 pm            
2:30 pm              
2:40 pm What's New In Drupal 8?
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What's New In Drupal 8?



Drupal is one of the world's premier content management systems -- and even runs the FUDCon Pune website! In this presentation, I'll talk about how the recent "PHP Renaissance" has affected Drupal, and highlight some of the new features coming in Drupal 8. Some of the topics of my talk include:

* object oriented PHP
* the Symfony framework
* improved editing experience
* multilingual support in core
* mobile ready
* views in core
* configuration management
* REST interface for getting data in and out of Drupal

By:
Jared Smith
June 26, 2015, 2:40 pm to 3:20 pm
Hall: Auditorium Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
Lessons learned from Bijra project
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Lessons learned from Bijra project



Bijra High School is situated at the outskirt of the Steel City of Durgapur in
West Bengal. Most of the students hail from adjacent villages Bijra, Sovapur,
Dhabani and urban slums of Mahuabagan, Hazra Para, Nagarjun slum and J.C. Bose
slum. The Majority of the students are from under-privileged minority,
Scheduled Caste and Scheduled Tribe families. They are first generation
learners. The School was officially recognized in 1993.

During 2007, with the help from Mr. Indranil Dasgupta from L2C2 Technologies ,
and Prof. Ashok Ranjan Thakur from WBUT, dgplug started a project on computer
aided learning. We had 4 dumb terminals and one desktop working as a server,
running Fedora using LTSP and the whole content was localized in Bengali. This
one project brought back the students to the classes and created enough
enthusiasm among them. It not only made them interested in computer learning,
but also to their regular lessons of the other subjects as well. Teachers also
found computer aided learning more effective and useful to those learners who
were actually unwilling to attend regular classes.

Project blog: http://bijra.dgplug.org

Talk outline
------------

- Introduction to Bijra project
- The school condition before the project
- Technical details of the project
- How we got the help?
- Changes it made.
- Things which went right.
- Lessons learned from the wrong steps.
- Current condition.
- How to spread the similar teaching/learning conditions to other schools.

Audience
---------

Beginner. This talk will be particularly helpful to the FOSS community builders,
they can find out the things which worked well, and they will also find out the steps
which never worked. The contributors will also see how their work effects the life of
remote Indian students.

By:
KAZI NIZAMUDDIN
June 26, 2015, 2:40 pm to 3:20 pm
Hall: Seminar Hall [4th Floor] Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
Open Source Identity Management with FreeIPA
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Open Source Identity Management with FreeIPA



The talk will introduce FreeIPA project as the first fully functional open source centralized authentication and identity management solution comparable to Active Directory in its capabilities but focusing primarily on the Identity Management needs of the Linux and UNIX client systems.

The talk would start discussing Identity Management problem from both infrastructure and application point of view, briefly analyzing related open source and proprietary technologies. The talk will then continue introducing the FreeIPA project, how it is built and what it can offer for infrastructure (identity, authentication, authorization or system services like SUDO) and applications (centralized user identity source, authentication). It will conclude with information how FreeIPA can cooperate with Active Directory, which is still the primary source of user identities in many environments.

By:
Martin Kosek
June 26, 2015, 2:40 pm to 3:20 pm
Hall: D203 [2nd Floor] Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
Development done responsively (FTW)
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Development done responsively (FTW)

As stakeholders in various positions of the software development processes, us developers often tend to make assumptions around the usage of our software. One famous assumption is the one where we decide that people interacting with our work will do it on the devices we originally developed on.

This workshop is the for the developer who'd like to incorporate Responsive Web Design practices into their work. There's enough material on the internet about the goodness of RWD, so let's skip that.

I'll show you how to mockup on the browser. It's no longer humane to do Photoshop/Inkscape mockups, simply because -
a) for how many devices will you do it? and
b) photoshop/inkscape is relatively easy arrangement of elements - if you're going to eventually put an effort on making it a working website, why not start it that way?

So we will:
1) First learn to do low-fidelity paper sketches to a webpage you fancy
2) Do a quick run through web layouts in CSS
3) Develop a mobile-first approach to developing the page
4) Learn enough SASS to put to practice - variables in CSS, maybe mixins
5) Take homework for
--> semantic HTML structuring
--> mobile first approach to writing CSS: choosing the right breakpoints, et all
--> introduction to some recent CSS specs, such as Flexbox, and the idea of cross-browser compatibility
6) Look at some elements of responsivity that is tied to touch-enabled devices
7) Learn some best practices
8) Document what we learn


* Attendees will work on real web pages with no time to teach how to do things TheOldWay, so I will assume reasonable familiarity with HTML/CSS. Not sure if that goes with conference rules, but we might want to do a selection test to confirm this.
* If any organizer, speaker or anyone in general wants their FOSS project layout revamped mobile first, they can show up. Once the workshop is over, I'll help connect attendees with folks who want help on their project.
* Can the workshop duration be extended? (More time the better)

By:
Sarup Banskota
June 26, 2015, 2:40 pm to 4:10 pm
Hall: D405 [4th Floor] Track: Workshop Type: Workshop
Introduction to Ceph Calamari
 Attend Link

Introduction to Ceph Calamari


Calamari is a management and monitoring system for Ceph storage cluster. It provides a beautiful Dashboard User Interface that makes Ceph cluster monitoring amazingly simple and handy. It also exposes a high level REST API perform management operations.

* A demonstration of the Calamari web interface, showing how you can monitor the health and performance of your Ceph cluster, and perform RADOS management tasks

* A technical deep dive into the Calamari REST API and architecture

* Upcoming features

* Information on how you can get involved in the Calamari project.

Calamari github

By:
Karnan Chidambarakani
June 26, 2015, 2:40 pm to 3:10 pm
Hall: D406 [4th Floor] Track: Distributed Storage Type: Talk
  FUDCon APAC 2016 BoF
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FUDCon APAC 2016 BoF

Discuss FUDCon APAC 2016 bids and decide on the course of action for the next FUDCon.

By:
Amit Shah, Kushal Das, Siddhesh Poyarekar
June 26, 2015, 2:40 pm to 4:10 pm
Hall: D205 [2nd Floor] Track: BoF Type: BoF
2:50 pm  
3:00 pm  
3:10 pm    
3:20 pm       Gluster for Hadoop workloads
 Attend Link

Gluster for Hadoop workloads


Speaker(s):
shubhendu's picture
Shubhendu
Tripathi
Twitter URL:
https://twitter.com/trips_shubh
LinkedIn URL:
Bio:

I work with RedHat Bangalore and majorly contribute to oVirt upstream project. I also contribute to glusterfs-hadoop plugin. I have got 11+ years of experience in different technologies like Java, Python and bit of C as well. Working with RedHat for close to couple of years.

GlusterFS is an open source, distributed file system capable of scaling to several petabytes (actually, 72 brontobytes!) and handling thousands of clients. GlusterFS clusters together storage building blocks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect, aggregating disk and memory resources and managing data in a single global namespace. GlusterFS is based on a stackable user space design and can deliver exceptional performance for diverse workloads.

The project glusterfs-hadoop enables Apache hadoop on GlusterFS. It provides a mechanism using which GlusterFS can be used as data store for Hadoop. Its a project done in Java to bypass the data calls to GlusterFS from Hadoop so this component replaces HDFS with GlusterFS

By:
Shubhendu Tripathi
June 26, 2015, 3:20 pm to 3:50 pm
Hall: D406 [4th Floor] Track: Distributed Storage Type: Talk
 
3:30 pm Lessons from building open source communities top-down vs bottom-up
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Lessons from building open source communities top-down vs bottom-up



In 2010, I went from being an amateur community organizer to being a professional. That is, I quit my job and made a bet that I could somehow make a living by organising community events encouraging people to use open source, something I had been doing for the past decade while earning nothing from it. In the four plus years since, I ended up running two experiments without realising it.

In the first, I had a vision for how things should work, so I built towards that vision. I wanted the community to adopt the open web and open source, so I organised conferences around those topics. I wanted peer review to ensure a high quality of content, so I built peer review tools and processes. The conferences were entirely top down. I had a vision for how they should work, and that's how they were built.

In the second, I kept getting requests for help with a certain problem, but I wasn't interested in it, so to tell people to stop bothering me, I built a website where they could talk to each other without involving me. I didn't want to be bothered for support, so I didn't put any contact information on the site. There was almost no way to tell who had built it or how to contact me. Everything about the site was to tell people to help each other as they saw fit, I had no interest in their problems.

The first experiment was HasGeek, which I'm happy to say has succeeded in paying salaries for a team of ten. Before we attempted this, nobody thought it was possible, so my top-down approach to it has been working. The second I did not even bother to give it a proper name. I called it "Has job" as a joke, then added "HasGeek Job Board" to clarify in case someone didn't understand. Hasjob doesn't earn anything for HasGeek, but has been so successful people think HasGeek is a job board company that for some reason organises events. People have trouble believing that nobody in HasGeek works on Hasjob day-to-day, the site just runs itself.

In 2013 we started having a spam problem with HR agencies harassing employers, so to get people to stop complaining, we started hiding contact information and requiring a user account to apply for a job. When we checked again in 2014, we had over thirty thousand user accounts! Hasjob was actually bigger than HasGeek now! And yet nobody in HasGeek (except me) knew anything about how Hasjob worked.

In 2015, I sat down to understand what had happened. How come a site we built to tell people to go away was doing better than something we did full time? The answer is that it was a bottom-up approach, while organising events was top-down. Bottom-up gets you great return for minimal effort, but the community goes where it wants to. Top-down gives you control, but it's a lot of work to push the community in the direction you want to go.

All of HasGeek's code is open source and available at https://github.com/hasgeek.

Talk outline
-------------

- Top-down: the HasGeek story
- Bottom-up: the Hasjob story
- Bottom-up doesn't mean no control: understanding how to exercise subtle influences
- What does this mean for your community?

Audience
----------

Community managers and volunteers, no technical background required, but some experience of working with open source communities is required.

By:
Kiran Jonnalagadda
June 26, 2015, 3:30 pm to 4:10 pm
Hall: Auditorium Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
ExpEYES : Python Powered Open Source Portable Science Lab
 Attend Link

ExpEYES : Python Powered Open Source Portable Science Lab



ExpEYES : Pocket Science Lab

With the objectives of developing affordable laboratory equipment and training science teachers, ExpEYES is from the PHOENIX project of Inter-University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi. It is an Open Hardware and Free Software framework for developing science experiments, classroom demonstrations and projects without getting in to the details of electronics or computer programming. It converts your PC into a portable science laboratory.

ExpEYES can be used to perform a large number of experiments. For example, the device can be used to study electromagnetic induction, interference of sound waves, Lissajous Figures, to measure gravity by time of flight, alongside many other applications. Concepts like Lissajous Figures and Electromagnetic induction are quite difficult for most students. ExpEYES allows the study of fast changing phenomena and is an effective tool for exploring electromagnetic phenomena and the laws of electromagnetic induction—namely, Faraday’s law and Lenz’s law. The ability to capture real-time graphs offers the important benefit for students to better visualize the associated phenomena and develop a deeper understanding of it.

In this session, I will be demonstrating various simple experiments using GUI's available for different experiments and also give examples of how easy it is to write simple programs in python and fetch and plot data using ExpEYES.


It will be great to engage science and engineering students, teachers and python enthusiasts with ExpEYES running on awesome fedora.

By:
Praveen Patil
June 26, 2015, 3:30 pm to 4:10 pm
Hall: Seminar Hall [4th Floor] Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
Linux-IO : Native scsi target implementation in linux kernel
 Attend Link

Linux-IO : Native scsi target implementation in linux kernel



Linux provide facilities to expose emulated LUNs to initiators using Linux-IO (LIO) scsi target implementation . LIO not only support exposing conventional block devices but also supports other storage interfaces like file or memory based LUNs. Also it supports multiple fabric interfaces - FC, FCoE, iscsi and many more.
LIO can be used in SAN environments with minimal storage resources.
Native support for LIO in linux hypervisors and in Openstack make it a good storage option for cloud deployments.

This talk will throw light on insights of LIO and its features and a quick hands-on with LIO.

By:
Kashish Bhatia
June 26, 2015, 3:30 pm to 4:10 pm
Hall: D203 [2nd Floor] Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
 
3:40 pm  
3:50 pm    
4:00 pm Introduction to GlusterFS and its features
 Attend Link

Introduction to GlusterFS and its features


GlusterFS is an open source, clustered file system capable of scaling to several petabytes and handling thousands of clients. GlusterFS can be flexibly combined with commodity physical, virtual, and cloud resources to deliver highly available and performant enterprise storage at a fraction of the cost of traditional solutions.GlusterFS is based on a stackable user space design, delivering exceptional performance for diverse workloads.

This workshop is intended towards those who are interested to learn GlusterFS & its features. Its going to be a hands-on session where the audience will learn how to setup GlusterFS, consume it, and manage it.

The speakers plan to provide pre-created VM images that can be used during the workshop to setup GlusterFS environment

Workshop Flow:

1) Intro to GlusterFS
2) Setting up a basic GlusterFS cluster
3) How to create and manage GlusterFS volumes (distribute and replicate modes)
4) Mounting GlusterFS volumes (NFS, native )
5) GlusterFS as a secure storage
6) Setting up GlusterFS using SSL/TLS Certificates
7) Using GlusterFS in openstack

Pre-Requisites :

A new GitHub project @ https://github.com/dpkshetty/Gluster-in-Docker has
been created for attendees.
Please go thru the README.md, follow the "Steps" section and ensure your
docker host is ready for use
at the workshop.

Its expected that attendees coming to this workshop would have completed
all the "Steps"
as mentioned in the README.md to ensure that we don't waste time in
setup/configuration related issues.


By:
Atin Mukherjee, Deepak Shetty
June 26, 2015, 4:00 pm to 5:00 pm
Hall: D406 [4th Floor] Track: Distributed Storage Type: Talk
 
4:10 pm            
4:20 pm Documentation: It's Important and Difficult
 Attend Link

Documentation: It's Important and Difficult

One of the ways that we encourage non-coders to contribute to Open Source projects is by writing documentation. And sometimes, as developers, we tend to look down on writing documentation. Personally, I think it's one of the most critical part of a project. If the documentation is hard to sort through or hard to read, there's going to be a whole bunch of frustrated users and contributors.

How can you write good documentation? Last July, I attended an unconference called "Write the Docs" in Berlin and we had an open discussion about how to create an environment for building good documentation. In this talk, I'm hoping to present some of the ideas that we came up with during those conversations and also talk about what we did in the CKAN project to make our documentation far better than it used to be.

By:
Nigel Babu
June 26, 2015, 4:20 pm to 5:00 pm
Hall: Auditorium Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
Android Development on Fedora 21
 Attend Link

Android Development on Fedora 21

Interest is growing fast in Android Development today.
More and more apps are being released by both business communities and others for smartphones.
Android apps can be developed very efficiently in Fedora 21.
Setting up the environment and starting to work is very easy and smooth.
The purpose of this talk is to encourage people to use Fedora 21 to build Android apps easily.

Topics to be covered:
1. Introduction to Android (3 minutes)
2. Android architecture (5 minutes)
3. Android app components (5 minutes)
4. Requirements for Android Development in Fedora 21 (3 minutes)
5. How to install Android Studio (5 minutes)
6. Building a simple app and running it on a real device (7 minutes)
7. Advantages of Android development in Fedora 21 (5 minutes)
8. Examples of apps (7 minutes)

By:
Mohan Prakash
June 26, 2015, 4:20 pm to 5:00 pm
Hall: Seminar Hall [4th Floor] Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
Introduction to networkd
 Attend Link

Introduction to networkd



Introduction to networkd, network management from systemd

systemd now includes support for basic network configuration through udev and networkd.
Discussion about basic systemd-networkd features and how to configure it.

for example:
1. DHCP .
2. NetDev (bond, vxlan, bridge etc)
3. LLDP



By:
Susant Sahani
June 26, 2015, 4:20 pm to 5:00 pm
Hall: D203 [2nd Floor] Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
     
4:30 pm      
4:40 pm      
4:50 pm      
5:00 pm              
5:10 pm Whats Going On In A FOSS Project
 Attend Link

Whats Going On In A FOSS Project


How would one look at FOSS projects to assess how it is doing? Are there ways to understand the progress (or lack there of) of work going on in a project? How would one review the thousands of projects to get a sense of their respective strengths and weaknesses?

This talk will discusss some of the work that has been done in metric gathering and assessment and the challenges it poses.

By:
Harish Pillay
June 26, 2015, 5:10 pm to 6:50 pm
Hall: Auditorium Track: Keynote Type: Talk
           
5:20 pm            
5:30 pm            
5:40 pm            
5:50 pm            

Saturday, 27th June 2015

Time Auditorium Seminar Hall [4th Floor] D203 [2nd Floor] D405 [4th Floor] D406 [4th Floor] D204 [2nd Floor] D205 [2nd Floor]
9:00 am Present and Future of Fedora Workstation
 Attend Link

Present and Future of Fedora Workstation

Fedora Workstation 21 received very positive reviews. The talk will focused on what it is going on in this flavor of Fedora and how we want to build on the success of F21, and what impact general trends in the Linux desktop area (Wayland, app containers) will have on Fedora Workstation.

By:
Jiri Eishchmann
June 27, 2015, 9:00 am to 9:50 am
Hall: Seminar Hall [4th Floor] Track: Keynote Type: Keynote
         
9:10 am          
9:20 am          
9:30 am          
9:40 am          
9:50 am              
10:00 am Kernel and Userspace Tracing with LTTng and Friends
 Attend Link

Kernel and Userspace Tracing with LTTng and Friends



Tracing is an important tool for diagnosing performance issues in critical applications (kernel/userspace). Sometimes debugging is just not enough as it may distort the application's flow itself. This talk shall discuss the most important features of the commonly used tracing tools (LTTng, SystemTap, Dtrace) and some surprisingly cool features they have (such as fast tracing from inside GDB).

Target Audience: Developers, sysadmins who want to have a detailed and fine-grained analysis of their applications of whole system in general

Tentative Outline
1. Introduction to Tracing
1.1 Why do I need it?
1.2 How can it benefit Fedora developers?

2 Tracing tools and their features
2.1 SystemTap/Dtrace
2.2 LTTng
2.3 GDB 's tracing infrastructure
2.4 Visualizing traces

3. Demos
3.1 Tracing with LTTng, SystemTap and even GDB!

4. Possible ways to integrate LTTng with current python projects for system-wide tracing

Sources I may be referring
1. https://suchakra.files.wordpress.com/2014/08/osfy_lttng_part_1.pdf
2. https://suchakra.files.wordpress.com/2014/08/osfy_lttng_april_2014.pdf
2. https://ctpd.dorsal.polymtl.ca/system/files/2may2012.pdf
3. http://ctpd.dorsal.polymtl.ca/system/files/11Dec2013.pdf

Prerequisites: Some knowledge of debugging/profiling tools, Linux kernel and modules

Benefits to Fedora
Tracing tools can help Fedora developers to diagnose bottlenecks and issues in their applications. For example, recently my lab-mate found this : http://multivax.blogspot.ca/2013/12/system-level-profiling-of-apt.html It's a small issue in apt-get which hits their performance. We can use such tools to have similar analysis of Fedora's infrastructure. It will also open up a way to integrate LTTng tracing infrastructure so that simple automated tools can collect traces from production systems used by Fedora developers.
Session Track:
Talk
Session Time Slot(s):
Experience level:
Advanced
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By:
Suchakra Sharma
June 27, 2015, 10:00 am to 10:40 am
Hall: Auditorium Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
Openstack on Fedora, Fedora on Openstack: An Introduction to cloud IaaS
 Attend Link

Openstack on Fedora, Fedora on Openstack: An Introduction to cloud IaaS



Enterprises are considering rapid transition of their work loads to cloud IaaS from legacy infrastructure. Though most users in the community are aware of this transition, they are unaware of the benefits and advantages it brings with it. Openstack is getting good attention as an open source operating system for cloud IaaS that can run on top of Fedora, at the same time Fedora images can be used for instances to run workloads. In this session you will learn:

- Advantages of Cloud IaaS over legacy infrastructures.

- How deployment of compute, storage and network is different from traditional way of deployment. ie, transition to compute-as-a service, network-as-a service and storage as a service.

- What role Fedora can play to power the infrastructure and power the application.

- Short demo of Openstack use cases after its installed on Fedora and instances running with Fedora image.

After the session, attendees will have good understanding of advantages and benefits or cloud IaaS using Openstack on Fedora and how to start playing with it to better learn it.

By:
Sadique Puthen Peedikayil
June 27, 2015, 10:00 am to 10:40 am
Hall: Seminar Hall [4th Floor] Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
Haskell is good for you
 Attend Link

Haskell is good for you



Haskell is a modern, general-purpose purely functional programming language, with lazy semantics, strong static typing, and a passionate community. Haskell's powerful type system with type inference, type classes, and pure higher order functions and monads give it a formal mathematical beauty and expressiveness not available in many other languages.

In this talk I will:

introduce the Haskell functional programming language
explain with examples how it can help you become a better programmer
discuss compiler performance and how Haskell is good at concurrency and parallel programming
talk about the Fedora Haskell SIG, its work and how to contribute
describe some well-known and cool Haskell projects: Hakyll, pandoc, Warp and Yesod, XMonad, Yi and shell-scripting.
describe resources for learning Haskell and joining the community

The talk is aimed at people who have basic programming knowledge and are interested in learning about functional programming. It will also be useful for those interested to know about the Fedora Haskell SIG.

Some links:

http://haskell.org
https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Haskell_SIG
http://johnmacfarlane.net/pandoc/ (markup converter)
http://xmonad.org/ (window manager)
http://www.yesodweb.com/ (a web framework)
Warp can "provide performance on a par with nginx" - http://www.aosabook.org/en/posa/warp.html


By:
Jens Petersen
June 27, 2015, 10:00 am to 10:40 am
Hall: D203 [2nd Floor] Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
Documentation in Open Source
 Attend Link

Documentation in Open Source

A session on what Technical writing is, how it works in an open source environment and what are the available open source documentation and publishing tools.

Part 1: Technical Writing Basics
This part intends to introduce basic technical writing principles and concepts such as, how technical writing emerged, a brief about style sheets and style guides, DDLC vs. SDLC, etc.
- Emergence of Technical Writing
- Technical writing concepts
- DDLC and SDLC go hand-in-hand
- Future of Technical Writing... Agile documentation!

Part 2: Writing in an Open Source Environment
This part aims to provide an overview of the benefits of technical writing in an open source environment.
- Technical writing the open source way
- DocBook?

Part 3: Open Source Writing Tools
- Open source authoring and publishing tools (PressGang and Publican)
- PressGang:
- Publican:
- Try it out!

Part 4: Contributing to Upstream Documentation Projects
- How can users contribute to fedora (or any other open source) documentation

By:
Vidya Iyengar, Nidhi Chaudhary, Nilamdyuti Goswami
June 27, 2015, 10:00 am to 11:30 am
Hall: D405 [4th Floor] Track: Workshop Type: Workshop
  Barcamp Morning Session
 Attend Link

Barcamp Morning Session

Details will be available at the time of the event.

By:
Various
June 27, 2015, 10:00 am to 1:10 pm
Hall: D204 [2nd Floor] Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
Testing and Hacking Anaconda - A workshop
 Attend Link

Testing and Hacking Anaconda - A workshop



Introduction :: Anaconda is the installation program used by Fedora, Red Hat Enterprise Linux and some other distributions. During installation, a target computer's hardware is identified and configured and the appropriate file systems for the system's architecture are created. Finally, anaconda allows the user to install the operating system software on the target computer. anaconda can also upgrade existing installations of earlier versions of the same distribution.

This workshop will give the introduction on what is Anaconda, how one can test it using various test cases in Fedora. Also, we will cover the new features introduced in Anaconda in Fedora22. As Installation can be scripted with kickstart to provide a fully unattended installation that can be duplicated on scores of machines, we will do it in workshop. Creating anaconda product image and customization will also be covered.

Main things which will be covered ::
=====================
1. Introduction
2. Creating anaconda product image and customization. We will show some magical things like how you can modify the anaconda source and build an ISO. We can replace the default wall paper with your picture.
3. Setting up Kickstart(tftp etc) server for automating installations via the network. Installation of Fedora OS automated as well as from the network, using kickstart file and Setting up Anaconda configuration in the server with various options for automatic partitioning(Basic, RAID, LVM), setting password, automating installation of packages, post-installation scripts etc

For advanced users, we will show how one can get the source code of anaconda and contribute.

Prerequisites ::
=========
1. Laptop with a VM installed in it.
2. Atleast 5GB of free HD space.
3. Fedora Server 21 already installed inside Virtualbox.
4. Fedora Workstation 21 ISO image downloaded and copied into Fedora Server 21 installation.
5. User should be comfortable with typing Linux commands and knowledge of File system hierarchy is a must.

NOTE :: We strongly recommend to do all these things on a VM.

This is session will be extremely useful for the following use cases,
1. System administrators managing large number of Fedora Linux installations in a company, college/school lab etc.
2. Developers who need to test/work on different flavours of Fedora without spending time on installation every time.

By:
Amita Sharma, Kaushik Banerjee, Swapneel Patnekar
June 27, 2015, 10:00 am to 12:10 pm
Hall: D205 [2nd Floor] Track: Workshop Type: Workshop
10:10 am  
10:20 am  
10:30 am  
10:40 am        
10:50 am Nuts and Bolts of Fedora Internationalization, Globalization
 Attend Link

Nuts and Bolts of Fedora Internationalization, Globalization



You will wonder when i say Fedora 21 supporting 641 languages, it is available in localized variant in these many language (Not fully but partially). This is Fudcon APAC, APAC is more about non English dominant countries and Fedora is well adaptable to requirement of these countries. Starting from storage, display to creating content in these languages.

What makes Fedora Adaptable to the requirements of these countries complex scripts including RTL (Right to Left) scripts like Arabic, scripts with thousands of characters like CJK (Chinese, Japanese and Korean) and scripts like Indic with complex reordering requirements.

Take away from this session will be understanding of core concept in internationalization and creating foundation for developing application adaptable to requirement of non English language.

Tags: Internationalization (i18n), Globalization (G11N), Localization (L10N), Fonts, Storage, Input Methods, Rendering Engines, Unicode

By:
Pravin Satpute
June 27, 2015, 10:50 am to 11:30 am
Hall: Auditorium Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
Be Secure with SELinux Gyan
 Attend Link

Be Secure with SELinux Gyan

Security Enhanced Linux (SELinux) provides tremendous power to tighten process security on Linux systems. By not optimising, or worse, by not enabling SELinux, Linux system/server hardening would remain incomplete, and the Linux systems/servers may be vulnerable to process hijacks/exploits.

The session is aimed at presenting the basics of SELinux in an easy to understand way, so that users would have strong foundational information to start using SELinux, and to progress at one's own pace to advanced usage. This would remove the barriers of fear in using SELinux, and provide the confidence to proceed to making use of SELinux, first on desktops and workstations, and then on to development and test systems, and finally on to production Linux servers, for widely used services. And then progressively, with the enhanced knowledge of experience, it would be easier to further progress to the advanced usage of SELinux, for securing customised services as well.

This session has been presented in various formats in the recent past:

https://rootconf.talkfunnel.com/2014/1079-selinux-for-the-uninitiated

https://miniconf.talkfunnel.com/2014-rootconf/1321-harness-security-enhanced-linux-for-a-truly-harden

http://wiki.centos.org/Events/Dojo/Bangalore2014

I am proposing this session for a talk, but I am also open to conducting the session as a workshop if the organisers feel that to be more suitable.

By:
Rejy Cyriac
June 27, 2015, 10:50 am to 11:30 am
Hall: Seminar Hall [4th Floor] Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
UEFI & Secure Boot
 Attend Link

UEFI & Secure Boot


Secure Boot is a new feature added in UEFI scheme and UEFI is suppose to replace the BIOS completely. Fedora does support and is a active member of UEFI/Secure Boot implementation. I would like to conduct a session on the same in which I will be covering:

-- What is UEFI / What is Secure Boot ? What is the need of it ? (Very small intro )
-- How this new firmware is making the fedora users life easier.
-- Difference between BIOS and UEFI based fedora systems booting.

By:
Yogesh Babar
June 27, 2015, 10:50 am to 11:30 am
Hall: D203 [2nd Floor] Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
Introduction to NOVA
 Attend Link

Introduction to NOVA

Within Openstack, multiple projects work together to deliver Infrastructure-as-a-service . Nova is one of the project responsible for providing compute service. In this session, I will introduce Nova and explain how does it work. Attendees of this session will learn:

What is nova? What role does it play inside openstack?
Nova architecture.
Different components within nova, their functions and how they work together.
What happens in background when you start instance? Explained using a fedora compute node and fedora instance.
Interaction of nova with other openstack projects like neutron, glance and cinder.

After this session attendees will have a basic understanding of Openstack in general and Nova in particular to start learning both.


By:
Pratik Bandarkar
June 27, 2015, 10:50 am to 11:30 am
Hall: D406 [4th Floor] Track: Openstack Type: Talk
11:00 am
11:10 am
11:20 am
11:30 am          
11:40 am Wifi: From Basics to Internals
 Attend Link

Wifi: From Basics to Internals

Wireless technologies and connections in Laptops, Cellphones, Access points.
Terms, Wireless tools, extensions, User interface.
Concept of Driver and Firmware.
Next generation wireless.
Debugging wifi connections.

By:
Kiran Divekar
June 27, 2015, 11:40 am to 12:20 pm
Hall: Auditorium Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
Of Trees and Sheriffs and Stars at Mozilla
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Of Trees and Sheriffs and Stars at Mozilla



We're all familiar with the test-driven development. I think we can all agree that while it might be hard to execute, writing tests for every bit of code you commit is a good idea. Writing tests is fairly easy, but after a certain point, not breaking them is hard. And when your software builds on way too many platforms, even watching your own commits for test failures is hard. To top it off, things may break intermittently for reasons that are beyond your control.

At Mozilla, there are a lot of builds on a lot of platforms. And tests are run on each platform, which means a developer pushing code will have to wait about 1 to 2 hours to make sure they didn't break anything with their push. And things do break in ways that you may never imagine.

Mozilla deals with these issues with humans. We're called the Sheriffs. I'll be talking about how we help make sure our distributed team of employees and community members manage Firefox builds and tests on a daily basis

By:
Nigel Babu
June 27, 2015, 11:40 am to 12:20 pm
Hall: Seminar Hall [4th Floor] Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
zRAM: Increased Performance in Android Linux
 Attend Link

zRAM: Increased Performance in Android Linux

The talk will be about zRAM and how it helps Android Kernel developers increase memory performance during heavy memory pressure conditions. It'll first cover the details about Android in-build memory management features, how they work. I'll then be proceeding with where zRAM comes into picture, implementation in little detail and how its enabled on Android.

By:
Ishan Mittal
June 27, 2015, 11:40 am to 12:20 pm
Hall: D203 [2nd Floor] Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
Compiling Linux Kernel & Submit first patch
 Attend Link

Compiling Linux Kernel & Submit first patch

Intended Audience: Beginner Level

Type: Students/Academicians. Typically this targets to get hands dirty on Linux Kernel.

Outline:
Students/Beginner gets excited when they got understanding of Linux Kernel contribution
but they face the fear of getting things lost by compiling kernel on real machine.
This session aims at making them to feel that they are in safe hands to carryout their work.
We are using virtual environments so that no loss, only gain. ;)

This workshop i.e. Hands-on session consists of following stuff:
1. Quick Overview of Linux Kernel
2. Gathering tools for Building the Kernel
3. Compiling the Linux Kernel in Fedora/CentOS
4. Write a sample device driver.
5. Send that driver as a patch to Mailing List.

Outcome:
This session aims to remove "Linux Kernel Phobia" from their minds and tries to give them joy ride.
Also aims at attendees that they will start diving into Kernel world at their own.

Pre-requisite:
Come with following things preinstalled:
1. Virtualbox or KVM (any one of them according to your choice)
2. Linux either Fedora or CentOS (Host and Guest MUST BE Linux) Preferably DVD Image of Fedora 20 or CentOS 6.5 DVD
3. Thunderbird 24.0.1 and configured as per this link: https://www.kernel.org/doc/Documentation/email-clients.txt
For 64 bits: https://ftp.mozilla.org/pub/mozilla.org/thunderbird/releases/24.1.0/linux-x86_64/en-GB/
For 32 bits: https://ftp.mozilla.org/pub/mozilla.org/thunderbird/releases/24.1.0/linux-i686/en-GB/

By:
Mayur Patil
June 27, 2015, 11:40 am to 1:10 pm
Hall: D405 [4th Floor] Track: Workshop Type: Workshop
OpenStack Swift: A highly available, distributed object store.
 Attend Link

OpenStack Swift: A highly available, distributed object store.



Openstack Swift is a highly available, distributed, eventually consistent object store. This session will give an insight into fundamentals of Swift which includes (but not limited to) the architecture, components and data placement in Swift.

Openstack Swift is an alternative to Amazon S3 service. But unlike S3, Swift is open source and can be deployed in your own data center. Wikipedia, for example, stores the thumbnails of images in a Openstack Swift cluster.

By:
Prashanth Pai
June 27, 2015, 11:40 am to 12:20 pm
Hall: D406 [4th Floor] Track: Openstack Type: Talk
11:50 am
12:00 pm
12:10 pm  
12:20 pm          
12:30 pm Community Architecture - a different perspective
 Attend Link

Community Architecture - a different perspective

The Fedora Community in India has evolved through a number of iterations of community building. The constant theme has been to demand a strong focus on "making". Continuing with the hacker principles which are typical to any Free and Open Source Software Community, the diverse opportunities within The Fedora Project offers an unique set of entry-points to all participants. This session proposal intends to investigate the existing approaches and generate some discussion around new methods to build a community of excellence.

This talk may be of interest to existing contributors, Fedora Ambassadors, mentors and anyone interested in participating to build a community that lives the Fedora values and is excellent to each other. We intend to do a quick round-up of the traditional tools and approaches to community building, put them in context of The Fedora Project, drill down a bit further to contextualize the efforts in India. Additionally, we would want to look at how an increased degree of transparency and creating a high quality of communication would pull in participation from existing like minded communities involved in similar spaces. For those who have been participating in The Fedora Project, the topics may be well worn, but the session would like to be a sharing of stories that would emphasize on the notion that the project and the community members have been able to build their skills off one another; treat each other as mentors and coaches; find every possible opportunity to work together and their common goals have been the glue that has continued to make the Fedora community in India an excellent place to be.

By:
Sankarshan M
June 27, 2015, 12:30 pm to 1:10 pm
Hall: Auditorium Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
Fedmsg: The message bus of Fedora Infrastructure
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Fedmsg: The message bus of Fedora Infrastructure



This talk will introduce FedMsg[1], it's utility and how it works. FedMsg is the message passing system based on ZeroMQ used by the Fedora project for its infrastructure. Services in Fedora Infrastructure are hooked up with FedMsg to send messages to one another over a message bus instead of communicating with each other in heterogeneous manner. The talk will also demo on how to build apps on top of FedMsg.

The talk will be organized as follows
==========================
- Introduction to FedMsg
- Why FedMsg?
- How it works?
- About the connected services
- Demo of an example app of FedMsg
- How to start contributing
- Questions.

Who is it for?
=========
This is for people who:
- are interested in web development
- are wannabe contributors to Fedora Project
- have basic to intermediate knowledge of Python
- have basic understanding of the MQs and web
- have a willingness to learn

Speaker Bio
=======
- Python/Django Programmer
- Open Source Contributor
- Speaker at Flock 2014, PyBelgaum 2015 and various meetups.
- Github - https://github.com/sayanchowdhury
- Blog - http://sayanchowdhury.dgplug.org

[1] http://fedmsg.readthedocs.org/en/latest/

By:
Sayan Chowdhury
June 27, 2015, 12:30 pm to 1:10 pm
Hall: Seminar Hall [4th Floor] Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
Introduction to nftables
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Introduction to nftables



nftables[1] is a project providing packet filtering and packet classification on Linux, and it is intended to replace existing iptables, ip6tables, arptables and ebtables frameworks. nftables is a combination of a Linux kernel engine, and a userspace utility.

Introduction,
limitations of iptables,
advantages over iptables

[1] http://netfilter.org/projects/nftables/

By:
Swapnil Nagarkar
June 27, 2015, 12:30 pm to 1:10 pm
Hall: D203 [2nd Floor] Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
OpenStack Storage Overview
 Attend Link

OpenStack Storage Overview



OpenStack is an open source cloud computing platform. Currently OpenStack is growing fast. I think its really good to talk about OpenStack.

This talk explains the Overview of OpenStack Storage and its components, like:

> OpenStack Block Storage (Cinder)
> Architecture of Cinder
> Features of Cinder
> OpenStack Swift Storage (Swift)
> OpenStack File Storage (Manila)
> Use cases of every storage

This talk is helpful to those, who use wants to use OpenStack Storage and who wants to develop applications on top of OpenStack storage.

By:
Bharat Kumar Kobagana
June 27, 2015, 12:30 pm to 1:10 pm
Hall: D406 [4th Floor] Track: Openstack Type: Talk
 
12:40 pm  
12:50 pm  
1:00 pm  
1:10 pm Lunch    
1:20 pm    
1:30 pm    
1:40 pm    
1:50 pm    
2:00 pm Group Photo
 Attend Link

Group Photo

We will taking the FUDCon Pune 2015 group photograph. Everyone should be there.

By:
Kushal Das
June 27, 2015, 2:00 pm to 2:30 pm
Hall: Auditorium Track: Group Photo Type: Talk
           
2:10 pm            
2:20 pm            
2:30 pm              
2:40 pm "Selling" Open Source 101
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"Selling" Open Source 101

Having skills in Open Source might land you a job in existing companies, but to some of us, working with others might not cut it. I will be talking about Open Source Businesses and how you can initiate your own business providing support and professional services around your Open Source expertise. I will be covering some lesson learned from a failure from my previous company, and also what I learned in the past year from observing the business operations of 2 major Open Source vendors - Red Hat and Hortonworks.

Contents:
- Why start an Open Source Business?
- Case Study: Inigo Consulting - what NOT to do
- Red Hat and Hortonworks & Open Source Business
- Models for your business

By:
Izhar Firdaus
June 27, 2015, 2:40 pm to 3:20 pm
Hall: Auditorium Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
Improving thread synchronization in GlusterD (Daemon for Glusterfs) using Userspace RCU (Read-copy-update)
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Improving thread synchronization in GlusterD (Daemon for Glusterfs) using Userspace RCU (Read-copy-update)



Glusterfs is a open source scalable distributed file system which can run in any commodity hardware. glusterD is daemon which manages the cluster configuration.

For more information about Glusterfs please refer to http://www.gluster.org/

What is Big-lock in GlusterD:
------------------------------------

GlusterD was originally designed as a single threaded application which
could handle just one transaction at a time. It was made multi-threaded to
improve responsiveness and support handling multiple transactions at a
time. This was needed for newer features like volume snapshots which could
leave GlusterD unresponsive for some periods of time.

Making GlusterD multi-threaded required the creation of a thread
synchronization mechanism, to protect the shared data-structures (mainly
everything under the GlusterD configuration, glusterd_conf_t struct) from
concurrent access from multiple threads. This was accomplished using the
Big-lock.

The Big-lock is an exclusive lock, so any threads which needs to use the
protected data need to obtain the Big-lock and give up the Big-lock once
done.

Problem with Big-lock
----------------------------

The Big-lock synchronization solution was added into the GlusterD code to
solve problems that arose when GlusterD was made multi-threaded. This was
supposed to be a quick solution, to allow GlusterD to be shipped.

Big-lock as the name suggests, is a coarse grained lock. The coarseness of
the lock leads to threads contending even when they are accessing unrelated
data, which lead to some deadlocks.

One example of this deadlock is with transactions and RPC. If a thread
holding the Big-lock blocked on network I/O it may result in a deadlock.
This could happen when the remote endpoint is disconnected. The callback
code would be executed in the same thread that has acquired the Big-lock.
All network I/O handlers, including callbacks, are implemented to acquire
the Big-lock before executing. From the above two, we have a deadlock.

To avoid this, we release the Big-lock whenever a thread could block on
network I/O. This comes with a price. This opens up a window of time when
the shared data structures are prone to updates leading to inconsistencies.

The Big-lock, in its current state, doesn’t even fully satisfy the problem
it set out to solve, and has more problems on top of that. These problems
are only going to grow with new features and new code being added to
GlusterD.

Possible solutions
-----------------------

The most obvious solution would be to split up the Big-lock into more fine
grained locks. We could go one step further and use replace the mutex locks
(Big-lock is a mutex lock), with readers-writer locks. This will bring in
more flexibility and fine grained control, at the cost of additional
overheads mainly in the complexity of implementation.

As an alternative to readers-writer locks, we propose to use RCU as the
synchronization mechanism. RCU provides several advantages above
readers-writer locks while providing similar synchronization features.
These advantages make it more preferable to readers-writer locks, even
though the implementation complexity remains nearly the same for both
approaches.

Read-copy-update (RCU)
--------------------------------

RCU, short for Read-Copy-Update, is a synchronization mechanism that can be
used as an alternative to reader-writer locks.

A good introduction to RCU can be found in this series of articles on LWN
[1] and [2]. The articles are with respect to the usage of RCU in the
Linux kernel, where it is used heavily.

The advantages that make RCU preferable to RWlocks are the following,

- Wait free reads
RCU readers have no wait overhead. They can never be blocked by writers.
RCU readers need to notify when they are in their critical sections, but
this notification is much lighter than locks.

- Provides existence guarantees
RCU guarantees that RCU protected data in a readers critical section will
remain in existence till the end of the critical section. This is achieved
by having the writers work on a copy of the data, instead of using the
existing data.

- Concurrent readers and writers
Wait-free reads and the existence guarantee mean that it is possible to
have readers and writers in concurrent execution. Any readers in execution,
before a writer starts will continue working with the original copy of the
data. The writer will work on a copy, and will use RCU methods to
swap/replace original data without affecting existing readers. Any readers
coming online after the writer will see the new data.
This does mean that some readers will continue to work with stale data,
but this isn't too big a problem as the data at least remains consistent
till the reader finishes.

- Read-side deadlock immunity
RCU readers always run in a deterministic time as they never block. This
means that they can never become a part of a deadlock.

- No writer starvation
As RCU readers don't block, writers can never starve.

Userspace RCU
--------------------

The kernel uses features provided by the processor to implement its RCU.
Userspace applications cannot make use of these features, but instead can
use the Userspace RCU library.

liburcu [3] provides a userspace implementation of RCU, which is
portable across multiple platforms and operating systems. liburcu also
provides some common data structures and RCU protected APIs to use them.

An introduction to URCU and its APIs can be found in this article on LWN
[4].

[1]: https://lwn.net/Articles/262464/
[2]: https://lwn.net/Articles/263130/
[3]: http://urcu.so/
[4]: https://lwn.net/Articles/573424/

By:
Atin Mukherjee
June 27, 2015, 2:40 pm to 3:20 pm
Hall: Seminar Hall [4th Floor] Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
Python3 Code profiling using Line_profiler
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Python3 Code profiling using Line_profiler



This talk will cover about how we can profile python code using line_profiler and improve the code.

The session will go as follows:
1) What is Profiling?
2) Introduction to Line_profiler.
3) Setting up the line_profiler and it's dependencies (if any).
4) How to profile python code and run the profiled code.
5) Understanding the profiler output.
6) Comparing the test results.

After this talk, the audience will have a clear view about code profiling, understanding it's output and how can we improve our code and comparing the results.

By:
Jackson Isaac
June 27, 2015, 2:40 pm to 3:20 pm
Hall: D203 [2nd Floor] Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
From Zero to Hero in Kernel Module Development
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From Zero to Hero in Kernel Module Development

K, lets be realistic. Its not possible in a short duration. But I'll give you something which is half as good as that! How about writing a simple kernel module which filters network packets? A module which is neither a lame "Hello World", nor a high end device device driver for some telecommunication tower hardware. But nevertheless, something which you can be proud of and form a basis for learning more advanced stuff. A module which your future you will remember with a smile :)

In short, you will create a small network packet filtering kernel module for a simple use case such a filtering based on the device or length orthe type of network packet.

Target Audience: Young and/or enthusiastic minds willing to kickstart kernel module development

Tentative Timeline
1. Introduction
1.1 Short theory about modules and their place in kernel
1.2 Structure of modules

2. System setup
2.1 Setup/distribute VMs
2.2 Setup toolchain
2.3 Custom kernel install demo (maybe)

3. Hello Module World
3.1 Write a basic module
3.2 Building out-of-kernel tree

4. Moving on to net-filter module
4.1 Browsing kernel for clues
4.2 Looking at Netfilter/tracepoint probes
4.3 Creating a module

Run the module. Feel awesome!

Prerequisites: Knowledge of C

Sources I may be referring
Linux Device Drivers (Chapter 2): http://lwn.net/images/pdf/LDD3/ch02.pdf
LKMPG: http://www.tldp.org/LDP/lkmpg/2.6/lkmpg.pdf
My trace filter presentation: http://ctpd.dorsal.polymtl.ca/system/files/11Dec2014.pdf

By:
Suchakra Sharma
June 27, 2015, 2:40 pm to 5:00 pm
Hall: D405 [4th Floor] Track: Workshop Type: Workshop
Introduction to SDN
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Introduction to SDN


What is SDN?

Importance in Cloud Environment.

How is it different from traditional Networking approach?

Control plane vs Data plane, OpenFlow.

Role of Network Virtualization.

Important components involved like: vNICS, Bridge, OpenvSwitch, tuntap etc

SDN with respect to Linux and virtualization like : Openstack(Neutron), KVM/QEMU.

Will speak about components in a cloud SDN Environment and their interaction, protocols used.

New Trends in Network Virtualization space like DPDK etc.

By:
Pankaj Gupta
June 27, 2015, 2:40 pm to 3:20 pm
Hall: D406 [4th Floor] Track: Openstack Type: Talk
Barcamp Afternoon Session
 Attend Link

Barcamp Afternoon Session

Details will be available at the venue during the event

By:
Various
June 27, 2015, 2:40 pm to 5:00 pm
Hall: D204 [2nd Floor] Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
Identity management FreeIPA workshop
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Identity management FreeIPA workshop

Introduction::
========
FreeIPA is a way to create identity stores, centralized authentication,
domain control for Kerberos and DNS services, and authorization policies
— all on Linux systems, using native Linux tools. While centralized
identity/policy/authorization software is hardly new, FreeIPA is one of
the only options that supports Linux/Unix domains.

Topics to be covered in workshop::
======================
- Installation - Ease of installation (Manual configuration of Directory
Server, CA, Kerberos, DNS is difficult)
- Setting up a client and server with ipa-client-install and
ipa-server-install commands
- Host based access control (Denying/Allowing access to hosts)
- sudo based access control
- Linux-AD Integration using FreeIPA and how clients can log on with
users from Active Directory

Prerequisites ::
=========
1. Laptop with two Fedora 21 or 22 VMs installed in it.
2. Keep freeipa-server rpm installed in one VM and freeipa-client rpm
installed on the second VM


By:
Martin Kosek
June 27, 2015, 2:40 pm to 5:00 pm
Hall: D205 [2nd Floor] Track: Workshop Type: Workshop
2:50 pm
3:00 pm
3:10 pm
3:20 pm        
3:30 pm Running Project Atomic and Docker on Fedora
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Running Project Atomic and Docker on Fedora

This talk will focus on getting started with Docker with an introduction to Project Atomic. We'll discuss why Docker can be a better choice than LXC and virtual machines in many scenarios. We'll discuss some technologies used in Project Atomic e.g. rpm-ostree, clustering via Kubernetes and networking via Flannel. The talk will be followed by a demo. We will be running a Fedora Atomic host feeding it cloud-init data for the demo.

By:
Aditya Patawari, Lalatendu Mohanty
June 27, 2015, 3:30 pm to 4:10 pm
Hall: Auditorium Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
Getting Started with IOT development using Fedora on ARM
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Getting Started with IOT development using Fedora on ARM

This talk is helpful for the ones palnning to jump start with IOT development on embedded target boards like Beagle Bone, Raspberry Pi etc. using Fedora ARM

Planning to cover the following aspects in this session

Introduction to IOT Standards & Protocols
Popular open source solutions for IOT development,especially from Eclipse IOT projects
Coverage of major IOT protocols like MQTT, CoAP, LWM2M etc
Existing packages/support from Fedora , eg:- mqtt-client, mosquitto, protocol stacks etc.
Building new solutions and packaging for Fedora
Customizing eclipse kura framework to work with fedora and packaging using rpm maven plugin
Building and Packaging eclipse californium for fedora using maven build system
Testing with Firefox Copper(Cu) Plugin, Ponte bridge
Summary:Scope & Status of IOT support on Fedora

By:
Rajesh Sola
June 27, 2015, 3:30 pm to 4:10 pm
Hall: Seminar Hall [4th Floor] Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
Creating applications using PostgreSQL : Some interesting examples
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Creating applications using PostgreSQL : Some interesting examples

Creating applications using PostgreSQL : Some interesting examples

It is often advisable to move large portions of application logic to the database layer. This increases data coherence and application performance. This talk shall detail two such applications

Audience
Beginner/Advanced

Talk outline

- Overview of what is available via the ORM layer and whats wrong with it

- A simple task queue
-- How does Red Hat decide what hardware to buy for internal labs

- Public housing
-- Many governmental agencies build and allot houses to Indians. Recently, one such agency
needed several repeated iterations to complete allotments of a few thousand houses from
just under a million applications. What went wrong and how we can help ?

By:
Madhavprasad Pai
June 27, 2015, 3:30 pm to 4:10 pm
Hall: D203 [2nd Floor] Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
Introduction to Openvswitch
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Introduction to Openvswitch



Open vSwitch is a production-quality open source implementation of a distributed virtual multilayer switch. The main purpose of Open vSwitch is to provide a switching stack for hardware virtualization environments, while supporting multiple protocols and standards used in computer networks The session "Introduction to Openvswitch" will cover the following points which will enable you to replace to replace standard Linux Bridges with openvswitch

Agenda

What is openswitch
Why openvswitch and role of Openvswitch in SDN
Different usecases of openvswitch
Demo (how to setup openswitch, use openswitch for your Virtual Machines and establish tunnels between openswitch instances)

Targeted audience

This 40 minute session will be useful for beginners, system administrators and for openstack implementors

By:
Ranjith Rajaram
June 27, 2015, 3:30 pm to 4:10 pm
Hall: D406 [4th Floor] Track: Openstack Type: Talk
3:40 pm
3:50 pm
4:00 pm
4:10 pm        
4:20 pm Introduction to DNSSEC - F22 feature
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Introduction to DNSSEC - F22 feature



Domain Name System SeCurity Extensions(DNSSEC) is a set of standards defined to extend the Domain Name System(DNS) protocol, to securely exchange information between DNS clients & servers. This session aims to introduce the audience to the nitty-gritties of the domain name system(DNS), its pitfalls, its security, its utility and importance to the users. This session is suitable for all kinds of audiences.

See:
-> http://www.dnssec.net/
-> https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Changes/Default_Local_DNS_Resolver

By:
P J P
June 27, 2015, 4:20 pm to 5:00 pm
Hall: Auditorium Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
Securing MongoDB In Cloud Infrastructure
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Securing MongoDB In Cloud Infrastructure



MongoDB is an open source NoSql database quite popular in community . Its document oriented database which provides features such as Replication , Load Balancing , Indexing, Aggrigation etc. With increase in could based hosting of services , securing the production database has become a challenge. This talk is going to highlight some of the features that I have used in production to secure the MongoDB provisioning in Public or Private cloud infrastructure .

Topics Covered are :

Authentication

Authorization

Encryption at Rest

Encryption in transit

By:
Hemant Wadhwani
June 27, 2015, 4:20 pm to 5:00 pm
Hall: Seminar Hall [4th Floor] Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
Storage issue troubleshooting from OS side
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Storage issue troubleshooting from OS side

Storage issue troubleshooting from OS side
Speaker(s):
ajitmote's picture
ajit
mote
Twitter URL:
LinkedIn URL:
Bio:

I am working for Red Hat and primarily focusing on storage, clustering technologies.

This talk will be more focused for administrator but will be good knowledgeable technical session for other Linux user as well. It will cover how to troubleshoot storage issue from operating system side.

I am planning to cover storage related issue starting with system boot failure to scsi related errors. Would like to touch some storage performance aspect as well depending upon time available.

I will be discussing below topics :
1. Boot issues (like kernel panic, lvm errors)
2. What are scsi return code errors and how to decode it.
3. How to map SAN LUNs to scsi device name which will help .
4. IO Performance
5. LVM, Multipath configuration and common issue ..etc

Tools or files which we will be useful for above are :
1. lvm.conf, /var/log/messages , /var/log/dmesg files dissection
2. commonly used sg_* utilities which are part of sg3_utils package
3. utilities provided by sysstat package for performance statistics
4. device mapper utility dmsetup
5. multipath
6. udev

By:
Ajit Mote
June 27, 2015, 4:20 pm to 5:00 pm
Hall: D203 [2nd Floor] Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
Introduction to CentOS Cloud SIG
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Introduction to CentOS Cloud SIG

CentOS Cloud SIG (CCS) is a group of people coming together to focus on packaging and maintaining different FOSS based Private cloud infrastructure applications that one can install and run natively on CentOS. We are a non vendor, non technology and non agent specific focus group, but we will gladly work with and build content to suit relevant niches or vendor ecosystems. This group specifically targets users who wish to install and run their own, independent ( or hybrid ) cloud infrastructure on CentOS Linux.

By:
Kushal Das
June 27, 2015, 4:20 pm to 4:30 pm
Hall: D406 [4th Floor] Track: Openstack Type: Talk
4:30 pm Contributing to OpenStack 101
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Contributing to OpenStack 101

Learn how-to contribute to openstack community and their workflow and best practices. Identify low hanging fruits in the community projects etc.

By:
Rohan Kanade
June 27, 2015, 4:30 pm to 5:00 pm
Hall: D406 [4th Floor] Track: Openstack Type: Talk
4:40 pm
4:50 pm
5:00 pm              
5:10 pm Achieving Community Goals with Fedora
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Achieving Community Goals with Fedora



The Tibetan community is one of the most targeted areas and has been the focal point of brazen computer spying network called GhostNet in the past years. It has safeguarded itself with help of open source tools and the fedora community.

With examples from GhostNet, one of the biggest cyber spying network discovered yet in the world, this session gives an introductions to people how they can use Open Source to improve their security-controls, mitigate attacks and build a community to use the power of open source communities. This sessions is an invitation to all who want to learn about the tibetan community and how they can use and integrate open source into their daily life and organizations to meet their needs.

By:
tenzin chokden
June 27, 2015, 5:10 pm to 6:00 pm
Hall: Auditorium Track: Keynote Type: Talk
           
5:20 pm            
5:30 pm            
5:40 pm            
5:50 pm            

Sunday, 28th June 2015

Time Auditorium Seminar Hall [4th Floor] D203 [2nd Floor] D405 [4th Floor] D406 [4th Floor] D204 [2nd Floor] D205 [2nd Floor]
9:00 am              
9:10 am              
9:20 am              
9:30 am              
9:40 am              
9:50 am              
10:00 am Barcamp (Morning session)
 Attend Link

Barcamp (Morning session)

By:
Various
June 28, 2015, 10:00 am to 1:10 pm
Hall: Auditorium Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
Needles & Pins - Inkscape Workshop
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Needles & Pins - Inkscape Workshop

Inkscape is a free vector graphics editor, and that you can draw more than a few vile circles with him, shows this workshop. Inkscape uses the SVG standard of the W3C. In addition of drawing paths and shapes, SVG can do also gradients and filters, how to get good results with this is to show this workshop. At the end of s small still life with needle and button should arise.

By:
Sirko Kemter
June 28, 2015, 10:00 am to 11:30 am
Hall: Seminar Hall [4th Floor] Track: Workshop Type: Workshop
Docker Basics Workshop
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Docker Basics Workshop

This workshop will cover necessary topics to make Docker and Project Atomic familiar for the attendees. The detailed topics are as below. Docker

Quick start to run Docker containers
Create custom Docker images from Fedora image which can be shipped anywhere via docker repositories.
Creating Docker files, building images and running them

Fedora Atomic host

Running containers using Docker
Using rpm-ostree to update hosts
Cockpit administration tool
Creating your own custom Atomic tree

Prerequisites

You need to carry your laptop. We are planning provide preconfigured virtual machine images for KVM and Virtual box. So please make sure that you have virt-manager (preferred) or virtualbox installed in your laptop. We are planning to distribute the images using use usb sticks/thumb drives/dvds. So if you have usb/thumb drive, please carry them with you as it will help you/others to quickly set-up their environments.

By:
Aditya Patawari, Lalatendu Mohanty, Shivaprasad Katta
June 28, 2015, 10:00 am to 11:40 am
Hall: D203 [2nd Floor] Track: Containers Type: Workshop
Version Control, you git
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Version Control, you git

Let's skip information on Git's niceness, and keep the information below focused on the session instead.

Depending on the audience, the plan is to:

* introduce Git.
what it is, why bother, simple and effective practices. Collaboration over GitHub (or any other remote if you'd like me to). For an introductory audience, I typically start with a story (varies with the conference, city, audience age and such) - for example, there are two authors collaborating on this book, and how they have a goofup and end up publishing something they didn't intend to. Or, like I did one 1.5 years back, rescuing extra terrestrials using open source software (http://www.slideshare.net/sarupbanskota/using-open-source-software-to-un...). The idea is not to throw too much terminology at a beginner, instead make him/her embrace why a tool is used and what are some best practices, with a little fiction and humor.

* explain how Git itself works.
I'll explain the concept of blobs, trees, and more trees and blobs inside trees, without making it sound confusing. It's simpler than it sounds. The ideal audience has played with Git well enough to understand branching. I'll walk them through the .git directory. When they make a change, where is the stuff stored? How does it change with more commits? What's this snapshot thing *really*? How is Git able to automagically store *all* of your file history along with the files, and still maintain such a lightweight size on your project?

* implement an extremely simple version of Git.
...as in feature wise, not simple as in easy.
I'll be honest, this will require me first explaining how Git itself works, so that's most of this category of talk. Towards the end, I'll first show around Rugged, the library that powers GitHub (and one I've recently done baby steps towards contributing to). Next, I'll explain a super simple implementation of Git in the language of my choice (Ruby - I know Infra, don't glare at me like that). You're free to play around in your favorite programming language of course, but I might be of limited help apart from explaining the core idea itself.

Bonus:
If there's enough interest and time, I can demonstrate how GlitterGallery internally works - it's Rugged-usage heavy, so it might just interest my next ..is Ninja still an acceptable role these days?.. contributor.

Notes:

* While I would personally enjoy keeping the talk focused toward how Git itself works, it's more likely the session will tend toward an introduction to Git, considering the student crowd.

By:
Mayur Patil, Sarup Banskota
June 28, 2015, 10:00 am to 11:30 am
Hall: D405 [4th Floor] Track: Workshop Type: Workshop
Android Humla
 Attend Link

Android Humla

Android Introduction
Android Architecture
Android File system
Android Security & Kernel
Linux kernel based protections
Android OS specific protections
Permission modules
Application Components
Activities
Intents
Services
AndroidManifest.xml
Reverse engineering
Dex2jar
Jd-gui
Apktool
Smali/Baksmali
ADB- Android Debug Bridge
SSL pinning bypass
Signing applications for android
Penetration testing
Burp suite (proxy)
Drozer
Application hooking using Introspy.
Exploiting android using Metasploit.
Application analysis
Analyze data at rest
Intercept data
OWASP Top 10
Mobile forensics
Reporting Bugs

Pre-requisites:

Laptop: Linux environment preferred (BYOD).
Comfortable with android smartphone or tablet.
Basic Linux and ADB commands.
Self-learning and an enthusiastic attitude.
Rooted android devices/ emulators.

Note: All other tools/apps will be provided during training hours.

By:
Rutwij Kulkarni, Sneha Rajguru
June 28, 2015, 10:00 am to 1:10 pm
Hall: D406 [4th Floor] Track: Workshop Type: Workshop
ExpEYES : Python Powered Open Source Portable Science Lab
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ExpEYES : Python Powered Open Source Portable Science Lab

ExpEYES : Pocket Science Lab

With the objectives of developing affordable laboratory equipment and training science teachers, ExpEYES is from the PHOENIX project of Inter-University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi. It is an Open Hardware and Free Software framework for developing science experiments, classroom demonstrations and projects without getting in to the details of electronics or computer programming. It converts your PC into a portable science laboratory.

ExpEYES can be used to perform a large number of experiments. For example, the device can be used to study electromagnetic induction, interference of sound waves, Lissajous Figures, to measure gravity by time of flight, alongside many other applications. Concepts like Lissajous Figures and Electromagnetic induction are quite difficult for most students. ExpEYES allows the study of fast changing phenomena and is an effective tool for exploring electromagnetic phenomena and the laws of electromagnetic induction—namely, Faraday’s law and Lenz’s law. The ability to capture real-time graphs offers the important benefit for students to better visualize the associated phenomena and develop a deeper understanding of it.

In this session, participants will be able to have hands on experience with ExpEYES. They will be able to do many experiments with the help of GUI's available for different experiments and also learn to fetch and plot data by writing simple python programs.


It will be great to engage science and engineering students, teachers and python enthusiasts with ExpEYES running on awesome fedora.

By:
Praveen Patil
June 28, 2015, 10:00 am to 11:30 am
Hall: D204 [2nd Floor] Track: Workshop Type: Workshop
 
10:10 am  
10:20 am  
10:30 am  
10:40 am  
10:50 am  
11:00 am  
11:10 am  
11:20 am  
11:30 am        
11:40 am Blender Workshop
 Attend Link

Blender Workshop

In this workshop, attendees will learn some basics to use the Open Source 3D graphics tool, blender in Fedora. This workshop will lead beginners through a simple project, animating a block of a jelly-like substance that falls to the floor. The project will teach attendees the absolute basics of the blender interface, and go on to make the simple project with a great result The intended audience of the workshop is aimed at absolute Blender beginners.

By:
Ryan Lerch
June 28, 2015, 11:40 am to 1:10 pm
Hall: Seminar Hall [4th Floor] Track: Workshop Type: Workshop
  Key Signing Party
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Key Signing Party

Bring in your laptop and GPG key(s) and increase the web of trust. To know more have a look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Key_signing_party

By:
Kushal Das
June 28, 2015, 11:40 am to 12:20 pm
Hall: D405 [4th Floor] Track: Workshop Type: Workshop
Flask 101: Getting started with Fedora Infra
 Attend Link

Flask 101: Getting started with Fedora Infra



What is Flask?
As stated in the official documentation[1] "Flask is a microframework for Python based on Werkzeug, Jinja 2 and good intentions.". Flask is a web framework which is easy to get started and write web apps in more Pythonic way because of it's design philosophy[2].

This is workshop is primarily for Python programmers. The workshop will be focused on building a web application using Flask along with the other plug-n-play libraries. Flask plays a essential role in the Fedora Infrastructure[3] as most of the web based projects are built on top on Flask e.g. fmn, fedocal, datagrepper etc. So, the workshop will provide a base to those who would like to start contributing to Fedora Infra.

The objective of the workshop is to build a TODO application covering the following topics in small incremental steps
0. What is a web framework
1. Configuring Flask
2. Writing a basic 'Hello World' application.
3. Templates
4. Form Handling
5. Storing data in database.

The later half of the workshop would concentrate on showing real code and concepts taught from Fedora Infra projects. If possible, we may also solve some a bug or two.

Pre-requisites for this workshop

1. Intermediate knowledge of Python.
2. Knowledge of decorators in Python.
3. Basic knowledge of HTML.

[1]: http://flask.pocoo.org/
[2]: http://flask.pocoo.org/docs/0.10/design/
[3]: https://github.com/fedora-infra

By:
Sayan Chowdhury, Ratnadeep Debnath
June 28, 2015, 11:40 am to 1:10 pm
Hall: D204 [2nd Floor] Track: Workshop Type: Workshop
 
11:50 am Fedora Atomic
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Fedora Atomic


Fedora 21 has three flavours namely workstation, Server, and Cloud. Fedora's Cloud flavour includes an Atomic Host image for deploying containers(like Docker). This session Fedora Atomic will enable you to understand why Fedora is shipping an atomic image and what are the benefits of Atomic Host

Agenda

What is Fedora Atomic ?
Why Fedora Atomic (Advantages system updates and management)
Introduction to rpm-Ostree
What is cockpit ?
Getting started with Atomic
Docker Basics

Targeted audience

This 40 minute session will be useful for beginners and system administrators.

By:
Aditya Patawari, Lalatendu Mohanty, Ranjith Rajaram
June 28, 2015, 11:50 am to 12:30 pm
Hall: D203 [2nd Floor] Track: Containers Type: Talk
 
12:00 pm  
12:10 pm  
12:20 pm    
12:30 pm      
12:40 pm      
12:50 pm      
1:00 pm      
1:10 pm Lunch Lunch  
1:20 pm  
1:30 pm  
1:40 pm  
1:50 pm  
2:00 pm Barcamp (Afternoon session)
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Barcamp (Afternoon session)

Details will be available at the time of the event.

By:
Various
June 28, 2015, 2:00 pm to 4:10 pm
Hall: Auditorium Track: Main Conference Type: Talk
Realistic Mockup in GIMP
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Realistic Mockup in GIMP

The GIMP photo editor is a free and light alternative to Adobe Photoshop and very capable of handling all of image processing needs. In this workshop, the attendees will learn the basics of this program. Even if then atendees have no idea of GIMP and design, the attendees will be able to understand most of it. But to gain access to the real power of the GIMP, some images manipulation concepts must be understood, and some familiarity with basic image editing methodologies must be learned later.

By:
Prima Yogi Loviniltra
June 28, 2015, 2:00 pm to 2:40 pm
Hall: Seminar Hall [4th Floor] Track: Workshop Type: Workshop
Hands-On Kubernetes
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Hands-On Kubernetes

Speaker(s):
coolsvap's picture
Swapnil
Kulkarni
FAS ID:
coolsvap
Twitter URL:
https://twitter.com/tweetsvap
LinkedIn URL:
Bio:

Works @RedhatSoftware, Contribute to @OpenStack, follow #BigData #Docker #Cloud #Virtualization
Blog @ http://tiny.cc/tdx9lx profile @ http://tiny.cc/tex9lx

Aim of the workshop is to
- Introduce Kubernetes to the participants
- Create Kubernetes cluster
- Deploy sample application
- Deploy multi-tier application

By:
Swapnil Kulkarni, Navid Shaikh
June 28, 2015, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: D203 [2nd Floor] Track: Containers Type: Workshop
  Android Humla (Afternoon session)
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Android Humla (Afternoon session)

By:
Rutwij Kulkarni, Sneha Rajguru
June 28, 2015, 2:00 pm to 4:10 pm
Hall: D406 [4th Floor] Track: Workshop Type: Workshop
  Fedora APAC BoF
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Fedora APAC BoF

Discussions on matters relevant to the APAC Fedora community, specifically things like budget management and future goals for ambassadors in the region.

By:
Various
June 28, 2015, 2:00 pm to 4:20 pm
Hall: D205 [2nd Floor] Track: BoF Type: BoF
2:10 pm    
2:20 pm    
2:30 pm    
2:40 pm      
2:50 pm AskFedora UX/UI & Functionality Overhaul
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AskFedora UX/UI & Functionality Overhaul

AskFedora is a community knowledge base and support forum and designed to be the primary place for community support in Fedora. It is powered by Askbot, Django based web application. The UI and the UX for AskFedora needs overhaul to give it some uniformity with the current Fedora websites.

There may also be changes to be done in Askbot itself and have possibility of being integrated upstream. We aim to achieve results similar to what Ask Ubuntu has achieved, however Ask Ubuntu is not based on Askbot and similar theming techniques can't be applied. Discussions are open for this.

But why? Over the years of its existence, AskFedora's popularity has increased and there are 11,000+ questions that have been asked on the website and has 12,500+ contributors as of today (out of which quite a few are active). We think, it really needs to 'look good' and 'provide a better user experience' now.

Status right now: Mockups during the last Design Fedora Activity Day (FAD) 2015 were done. Checkout these blogposts[1][2] for latest updates on mockups. An openshift instance[3] has also been created and source for testing repository[4] is available for setting up your own staging instance.

Recommended prerequisites*: Front-end (HTML/CSS/JS) development, UI/UX design experience, some knowledge of Django/Python [*not mandatory]

[1] https://suchakra.wordpress.com/2015/01/20/ask-fedora-ux-redesign-updates-1
[2] https://suchakra.wordpress.com/2015/01/21/ask-fedora-ux-redesign-updates-2
[3] http://askbotstg-suchakra.rhcloud.com/questions
[4] https://github.com/fedoradesign/askbot-test

Essentially, all support infra is setup, we just need to sit together, have some coffee and start working :)

By:
Suchakra Sharma
June 28, 2015, 2:50 pm to 4:20 pm
Hall: Seminar Hall [4th Floor] Track: Workshop Type: Hackfest
   
3:00 pm      
3:10 pm Orchestration of Docker containers using Openshift v3 and Kubernetes
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Orchestration of Docker containers using Openshift v3 and Kubernetes

1. What is a PaaS?

2. Kubernetes-Introduction [0]

3. Architecture of Kubernetes
i) Explanation of each component and it's use.

4. Use of Kubernetes

5. Openshift v3 -Introduction [1]

6. Architecture of Openshift v3.
i) How Openshift works with Kubernetes, Docker, Atomic ?

7. Deploying apps with Openshift v3.

8. Advantages of using Openshift.
i) Developer Environment
ii) Scale with load
iii) Deployment and CI made easy.

[0] - https://github.com/googlecloudplatform/kubernetes
[1] - http://www.openshift.org/#v3, https://github.com/openshift/origin

By:
Miheer Salunkhe
June 28, 2015, 3:10 pm to 4:00 pm
Hall: D203 [2nd Floor] Track: Containers Type: Talk
   
3:20 pm    
3:30 pm    
3:40 pm    
3:50 pm    
4:00 pm Open Discussion
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Open Discussion

By:
Aditya Patawari, Lalatendu Mohanty
June 28, 2015, 4:00 pm to 4:20 pm
Hall: D203 [2nd Floor] Track: Containers Type: Talk
   
4:10 pm        
4:20 pm              
4:30 pm Closing Ceremony
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Closing Ceremony

By:
Rupali Talwatkar
June 28, 2015, 4:30 pm to 5:30 pm
Hall: Auditorium Track: Keynote Type: Keynote
           
4:40 pm            
4:50 pm            
5:00 pm            
5:10 pm            
5:20 pm            
5:30 pm              
5:40 pm              
5:50 pm              

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